Dances Made to Order

2013 En Route Dance Film Festival Program

11/20/2013 by Kingsley Irons | Comment

The En Route Dance film Festival will be online, everywhere starting from December 7 at 5:00 pm PDT though December 14 at midnight ONLY. Your $20 ticket gives you temporary, 24-hour access to our program from December 7 -14 which includes beautiful and thought-provoking films from all over the world. For tickets visit: http://dancesmade.com/enroute/

If you’ve already purchased a ticket. you will receive an email on Dec 7 at 5:00 pm PDT when we are “live” that will include instructions on how to log in and view the program.

En Route is curated by champions of Art and dance film: award-winning filmmaker, Cari Ann Shim Sham*; videomaker and screendance Festival Director of Agite y Sirva Ximena Monroy, Onur Topal-Sümer, dance filmmaker, director and curator of Dance Camera Istanbul and Kingsley Irons and Bryan Koch, founders of Dances Made and the En Route Dance Film Festival. Learn more about our curators here: http://bit.ly/1bQVuZP.

2013 En Route Dance Film Festival from Dances Made to Order on Vimeo.

Ssteadfast Body Marshmallow Heart for En Route

Steadfast Body, Marshmallow Heart directed by Erin Malley
Steadfast Body, Marshmallow Heart follows an armless, legless mannequin as she pursues her dreams at dance class.

The Time It Takes for En Route

The Time It Takes directed by Simon Fildes and Katrina McPherson
the time it takes to arrive, to live, to make a land, to find, to fall, to settle in, to work, to build, to seize the day, to journey, to be happy, to make a story, to dance, to pick up the pieces, to laugh, to sing a song, to love, to grow, to bury the dead, to lose, to uncover the past, to walk, to imagine the future, to leave, to return
the time,
it takes

Thank you to Ellen Bomberg who recommended this film to us.

Concert for Shadows for En Route

Concert for Shadows directed by Alessandro Amaducci
A meta-choreographic duet between artificial and natural dimensions

Thank you to Jeff Curtis with Greg Catellier for Dance 4 Reel for helping us find this film.

Turn Around Tango for En Route

Turn Around Tango directed by  Marites Carino
In this inventive choreography, two dancers turn the tango on its head, and back-to-back becomes the new cheek-to-cheek. After making contact, the duo intertwines in a backward, yet elegant, elastic embrace and feels each other out. In this awkward, yet sexy dance, their hope builds until their eyes meet for the first time. Could this be ‘the one’?

Je ne sais for En Route

Je Ne Sais Plus Qui a Fait Quoi (I don’t know who did what any more) directed by Antoine Renouard
Women and Men,
Fates, united, go forward.
To each their difference, to each their truth.
The stronger truth is always best.

All This Can Happen for En Route

All This Can Happen directed by Siobhan Davies and David Hinton
A flickering dance of intriguing imagery brings to light the possibilities of ordinary movements from the everyday which appear, evolve and freeze before your eyes. Made entirely from archive photographs and footage from the earliest days of moving image, All This Can Happen (2012) follows the footsteps of the protagonist from the short story ‘The Walk’ by writer Robert Walser. Juxtapositions, different speeds and split frame techniques convey the walker’s state of mind as he encounters a world of hilarity, despair and ceaseless variety.

Thank you to Simon Fildes for recommeding this film to us.

Ondek for Dances Made

Ondek directed by Louis-Martin Charest
A merchant sailor decides to leave behind a life at sea. After months spent onboard a ship, he orchestrates what is to be his last night in the company of his crewmates. A celebration ensues, in which reality seems to sway towards the euphoric. Dancing becomes the means to imprint this momentous time forever. Set to “We Are Young” by the musical group FUN., the film unexpectedly uses hip hop and jazz dance as the medium to convey the narrative in our hero’s story.

Los Hombres Lapida for En Route

Los Hombres Lapida (The Gravestone Men) directed by Eduardo Esquivel
Some tasks feel impossible.

Tournee Cadenza for En Route

Tournée Cadenza directed by Carlos Dittborn
Through the poetics of the body in motion, Tournée Cadenza embarks on an unknown journey into the abstract and recondite emotional state of vulnerability and the strength demanded to face each new experience. The temporal state of each moment suggests a voyage convening at the meeting of the power of a body in action and the delicacy of its motion, with admiration for the ethereal beauty of its convergent flow.

Break Adventure for En Route

Break Adventure directed by Igor Krasik
Photography is related to the theater. The stage is the frame. The freezing dance pose is similar to photo deduction. The abstraction, paper handling and synthesis of sound and movement is the essence of the piece. It’s about the visual in the music

Melting Justice for En Route

Melting Justice directed by  Petna Ndaliko Katondolo
Melting Justice a film from the Democratic Republic of Congo, is a mediation on agency vs voyourism that simultaniously captures instances of embodied critique while confronting the viewer with challenging questions about the passive consumption of spectacle that fuels a global concensus of silence.

Thank you to Screendance Africa for helping us find this gem.

Blowing up the Meridian for En Route

Blowing Up of the Meridian directed by Catherin Meyburgh
Blowing up of the Meridian is part of a bigger installation of 5 projections which was first exhibited at dOCUMENTA13 in 2013. The resistance to accepting the concept of time in all it’s forms was the inspiration for this work. It was inspired by the anarchist Martial Bourdin who decided to attack the observatory in Greewich representing a neutrality of time. So with the resistance to the imposition by the colonial European’s need to ‘order’ the world in time zones, comes the ‘Blowing up of the Meridian’ as the metaphor.

Thank you to Screendance Africa for helping us find this gem.

Reflections for En Route

Reflections directed by Lenora Lee and Olivia Ting
Reflections addresses the struggle for dominance and survival. Traditionally, Chinese lion dances at festival bring good luck and drive away misfortune, However, in this short film, the lions represent dual roles of heroism and inner demons for a man coming to terms with his identity in a land that may never embrace him. The lion mask, for him, embodies a false sense of defiance, of power. Ultimately, when the mask is stripped of its outer skin, he is left unadorned to face his truths.

Pas for En Route

Pas directed by Courtney Harris and Charli Brissey
Pas, a satirical paraody, extends upon ballet’s tendency to embody animal qualities. Subverting Western ideologies of grace and beauty, Brissey and Harris incorporate untraditional and comedic animal imagery, while also destabilizing ballet’s heteronormative structure through queer suggestion.

Thank you to Hamel Bloom, Executive Director of the Sans Souci Festival of Dance Cinema for helping us find this film.

Moverevermore for En Route

moverevermore directed by Oleg Stepanov and Alexey Torgunakov
One mover to another mover
Two movers in one mover
One mover in two movers
Two movers move for every mover
Mover evermore

Panspermia for En Route

Panspermia created by the Axolotl Collective
A short journey in a vast territory where two aliens perpetuate a cosmic lineage

Woodbleed for En Route

Woodbleed directed by Mauricio Ascencio 
The Wood Bleed project forms part of a series of video-portraits. These portratis offer a possible visual moments, macro-visions of the individual from my own perception of the subject. Materializationd and externalizing of the subjective, is revealed through detailed and minimal exploration of these moments.

The Art of Defining Me for En Route

Art of Defining Me directed by Seeta Patel & Kamala Devam
In a tick box society where identity has become a commodity, directors /choreographers Seeta Patel and Kamala Devam join Director of Photography Maria Åkesson to create a short film which takes a humorous look at how we as humans are influenced by the expectations and definitions placed upon us. Not a simple retaliation, the work observes and comments upon how we embody these expectations to find a certain safety and solace in them, almost enjoying them. But who puts us in these boxes – society, institutions, individuals or ourselves?

Thank you to  Gitta Wigro who introduced us to  to Kamala and Seeta’s work.

Cinética for En Route

Cinética created by La Ignorancia Dance Film Music Collective
A moment in time of the life of four women. This dance film shows through the body the ambiguity of a real and imaginary world where a woman searches, dances, fights or plays without separating what is lived and what is dreamed.

Thank you to Dances Made and En Route alumna Tori Lawrence for helping us find this film.

Awesome Without Borders

We would like to acknowledge the Awesome Foundation for providing the funding to make this online festival possible.

 

An Interview with Erica Rebollar and David Dowling

11/20/2013 by Kingsley Irons | Comment

Erica rebollar for Dances Made

Erica Rebollar created The/Line for Edition 30 of Dances Made. She and one of her collaborators, David Dowling talk to us about their creative process. They had three weeks to create a dance film inspired by these ideas chosen by our audience: feminine/masculine and What am I hiding from?

Read this great interview where we get to know them a little. Watch The/Line exclusively available on Dances Made to Order. Your contribution goes back to our artists to support their work.

Why are you interested in making dance film?

Erica: To expose the imaginations and different perspectives of and from the dancers, time and space that would not be possible in a typical proscenium show.

David: With the staging and pacing abilities of film, dance is able to exist in a way it could never do live. You have the ability to enhance moments, movements and choose where to direct the attention of the viewer. With the framing of a screen, you are able to express and get your vision across in a streamlined manner. It also allows the choreographer to explore possibilities in scenery, props and location. We really wanted to push the ideas of all the dancers and collaborators involved to see where that took us. It was a chance for experimentation and we wanted to try something we had never done before.

What was your initial reaction to the themes chosen by our audience?

Erica: It’s challenging to deal with the theme of “Feminine/Masculine” without doing it in an expected way…expected being either heteronormative or contradicting heteronormativity. How to find a way in without using stereotypical images?

Tell us a little about your creative process…

Brainstorming with the company at a diner after rehearsal, challenging ideas, trying out many scenes and locations. Some worked, others didn’t. Much is on the cutting room floor as fodder for the next film!

Name a film that changed your life.

Erica: An Andalusian Dog. It was the first film I watched that uses surrealist dream logic in a non-linear way, and is as beautiful as it is disturbing. I especially enjoy the choreography of the cinematography in perspectives of bodies in motion and under varying states.

David: 2001 A Space Odyssey was definitely an influence on my life for how it explored timing and cinematography, as well as the perspective of how we place ourselves in life. There are themes of mortality, time, evolution, technological progress, and the idea of something greater than yourself.

Name a dance performance that changed your life 

Erica: Pina Bausch left a hole in the modern dance world. Watching her work is like being in a cathedral during a hurricane; her dances make you want to live inside of her onstage world. After a 2-½ hour show, audiences left joyful and rejuvenated. Also, Martha Graham for her defiance and strength. As a teenager, I had a VHS tape of Sketches of Chronicle and it still excites me to watch today.

What is your favorite drink and where do you get it? 

Erica: In Solo, Indonesia there is a banana/nutmeg/papaya seed concoction I’ve never tasted since.

If you could live in another time period, which would it be? 

Erica: 1970s, with elongated and relaxed fashions, lack of cell phones and Internet.

What are some things you can’t live without?

Erica: Time alone, books, and rest.

 

 

An Interview with Natalie Metzger

11/12/2013 by Kingsley Irons | Comment

Natalie Metzger presents 'Barely'

Natalie Metzger collaborated with Jin Kyu Ahn to create Echo for Edition 29 of Dances Made. Their film was inspired by these themes chosen by our audience: spirit/flesh and gritty, grainy graceful. Watch it online exclsively on Dances Made.

Why are you interested in making dance film?

Dance film brings the audience right up against the skin and the body of the dancer, closer than in most live performances. In dance film, you can see the sweat bead, the muscles flex underneath the skin, you can hear the breath. It allows the audience to feel the intense, visceral nature of the movement. It is a constant frustration of mine in live performance that I often feel so distant from the dancer and the intensity of their body in the space (although there are some really interesting live performances that fight against this). I am often bored by the proscenium stage. But the camera allows me to examine the body from all sorts of angles and proximities. And it allows the audience to “dance” with the dancer since the camera movement is often as choreographed as the actual choreography. When I choreograph, I think about subtleties like eye movements, facial muscle contractions, little tensions in different parts of the body, but often those aren’t visible on the stage. Dance film allows the audience to see my movement the way it was meant to be seen in the body.

What was your initial reaction to the themes chosen by our audience?

They sounded like something I would put in my artist statement. They seemed to align directly with my personal aesthetic. I love extremes, especially ones that seem to combine so beautifully like gritty and graceful. I’m also obsessed with the body and its visceral nature, so the word “flesh” is often something that I use in my work and in design concepts.

Tell us a little about your creative process…

I generate a lot of material and then throw a lot of it out. I try to figure out the overall structure first, do a full pass with general strokes, and then go in to develop the specific details and nitpick. I find that this allows me to not get caught up in perfectionist tendencies too early in the process.

Name a film that changed your life .

Alien

Name a dance performance that changed your life.

Christopher House’s Sly Verb. I saw Sly Verb in college, and it was the first time that I saw a dance piece that incorporated live video feed and projections. It was also one of the most visceral pieces I had ever seen up to that point in my life. They actually used medical devices to prick one of the dancers’ fingers to draw blood on stage and filmed it close up so that we saw it on the projection behind them. It made me squirm, and I loved that I could have such a strong reaction to something happening on stage. There was also really stunning, minimal scenic design in that piece, which I always love in live dance.

If we were going to spend the day with you hanging out with you, what would we do? 

Go to the library, read the book that I got at the library at a Starbucks in a busy downtown area where I can people watch and feel the energy of the city around me, go to the movies, take a yoga class, and then relax and play videogames with friends.

What is your favorite drink and where do you get it?

Chocolate peanut butter milkshake.

If you could live in another time period, which would it be?

The future.

What are some things you can’t live without?

Audiobooks, electronics, chocolate, and water.

Echo created by Jin Kyu Ahn for Dances Made

Watch Echo created by Jihn Kyu Ahn and Natalie Metzger for Edition 29 of Dances Made available exclusively on our site. Your contribution goes back to our artists to support their work. Natalie was also a featured artist in Edition 4. She created Surgeon General’s Warning which was selected to screen at several festivals. Watch it on our site here.

 

 

 

An Interview with Brittani Hom

11/5/2013 by Kingsley Irons | Comment

Brittani Hom for Dances Made

Brittani Hom and Jasmine Stack created the dance film 7:18 for Edition 29 of Dances Made. Their film was inspired by these themes chosen by our audience: spirit/flesh and gritty, grainy graceful. Watch it online exclsively on Dances Made. Your donation goes back to our artists to support their work.

Why are you interested in making dance film?

This has been the first official experience I’ve had writing and directing a dance film, and it has been an incredible learning experience and journey. My previous video and film work has involved movement on camera but I never thought to classify it as dance film. Now that I’ve officially made my own dance film and worked closely with a choreographer/dancer (Jasmine Stack), I’ve learned about how you can take dance to a different level: by adding magic to the story through filmmaking. It’s beautiful how movement can be used to create a story and physically demonstrate often abstract concepts. Jasmine and I discussed how just as there is a difference between acting for the camera and acting for the stage, there is a difference between dancing for the camera and dance performance on stage. The slightest movement and change in facial expression on camera is magnified and can resonate just as much as big movements on stage. That’s powerful!

What was your initial reaction to the themes chosen by our audience?

I was initially a bit shocked, but after discussion with Jasmine, we both had a eureka moment of a potential story relating to these two themes based on a recent life-changing event we experienced together.

Tell us a little about your creative process…

Jasmine and I collaborated by meeting frequently to discuss what direction we wanted to go into creatively. We both wrote and drew in our journals and would share with each other all of the ideas we had. I decided to write some poetry after we thought of the story we wanted to create, and she informed me that she could create dance phrases based off of my poetry.

Name a film that changed your life.

One film that changed my life is Turtles Can Fly written and directed by Bahman Ghobadi. I watched this film last year and cannot put into words how much it altered the way I view everything. The cinematography and symbolism were breathtakingly and heartbreakingly inspiring. After watching this film, I challenged myself to make each of my works with as much integrity and depth, never neglecting humanity; breathing life into art.

Name a dance performance that changed your life.

I will preface my answer by saying, by no means have I had an educational background of dance. As of this moment, I don’t have a particular dance performance that has changed my life. I have seen some of Pina Bausch’s works and from learning her philosophies and about how much she has influenced the world of dance, I greatly respect her and think of her as a human being and one of the great masters.

If we were going to spend the day with you hanging out with you, what would we do?  

I would propose watching a few films, perhaps some old favorites and/or films that we haven’t seen yet. I definitely love to connect to others through deep conversation about life, art, ideas, etc., so I can guarantee there would be conversations and discussions peppered throughout the day. During this day of watching films and conversation, we would either try cooking delicious meals and/or go out to eat equally delicious meals.

What is your favorite drink and where do you get it?

At the moment, I like milk tea with pudding instead of boba. There isn’t any teahouse in particular that I like to go to, but the best that I’ve been to tend to be in San Gabriel, CA.

If you could live in another time period, which would it be? 

It would have been interesting to live during the 1960s, 1970s, or 1980s and experience and be a part of the different art and film movements back then. Many of my favorite films came from these three eras.

What are some things you can’t live without?

I can’t live without love, art, my family and friends, a camera, books and other reading materials, a device that will allow me to view films and videos, conversation and collaboration with others, and various visual art materials of both analog and digital interface.

7:18 created by Brittani Hom for Dances Made

Brittani Hom and Jasmine Stack created the dance film 7:18 for Edition 29 of Dances Made. Their film was inspired by these themes chosen by our audience: spirit/flesh and gritty, grainy graceful. Watch it online exclsively on Dances Made.

 

An Interview with Jin Kyu Ahn

10/29/2013 by Kingsley Irons | Comment

Jin Kyu Ahn for Dances Made

Jin Kyu Ahn and collaborators created Echo for Edition 29 of Dances Made. Their film was inspired by these themes chosen by our audience: spirit/flesh and gritty, grainy graceful. Watch it online exclsively on Dances Made.

Why are you interested in making dance film?

New encounters. A mixture of different genres is always interesting and ambiguous. In that ambiguousness, there are lessons which interest me.

What was your initial reaction to the themes chosen by our audience to inspire your film (spirit/flesh and gritty, grainy graceful)?

A fact that it’s separated, but inseparable. Or, an inseparable but separated situation.

Tell us a little about your creative process…

I think about bigger pictures and write poems on them. Then, I imagine little pictures and details about the ideas. Through the interactions and relations in those pictures, I delve into ways to convey messages.

Name a film that changed your life.

I’ve been impacted by many films, but nothing really has changed my life.

Name a dance performance that changed your life

I’ve been impacted by many performances, but nothing really has changed my life.

If we were going to spend the day with you hanging out with you, what would we do?

I would escort you to my special place. If you happen to be struggling with something in the mean time, we would just rest together and everything will be on me.

 If you could live in another time period, which would it be?

I would like to return to those times, one bye one, that I cannot quite recall well. All the times I can actually remember are valuable and meaningful for me.

What are some things you can’t live without?

Love and Love.

Echo created by Jin Kyu Ahn for Dances Made

Watch Echo created by Jihn Kyu Ahn and collaborators for Edition 29 of Dances Made available exclusively on our site. Your contribution goes back to our artists to support their work.